Discover the Hidden Hazards Lurking in Your Home

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A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care in 2012 compared phthalate levels in the 114 diabetic subjects and the 902 non-diabetic subjects. Following adjustment for sex, body mass index, serum cholesterol, triglycerides, education, smoking, and exercise, investigators noted that a significant relationship between phthalates in the blood and lowered insulin secretion, increased insulin resistance, or both. Egads!

The study, pioneered by Leonardo Trasande of New York University confirms what a growing list of research has already demonstrated: that there are devastating effects that occur as a consequence of daily chemical exposure. Endocrine disrupting chemicals can be found in a vast number of everyday household products that disrupt the natural rhythm of the body’s hormonal production.  Such chemicals can be found in furniture, canned goods, carpets and cleaning products can radically disrupt a variety of bodily functions.

Trasande suggested that household chemicals result in a yearly cost of 340 billion dollars to the U.S. economy as a consequence of treatment costs and lost productivity. “Our findings speak to the need for a strong regulatory framework that proactively identifies chemical hazards before they are widely used, and the use of safer alternatives,” said the researchers.

“In the absence of such a framework, newly developed synthetic chemicals may emerge as diabetogenic exposures, replacing banned or substituted hazards as contributors.”

And now for something completely unexpected. Investigators studied data from 1016 participants in the Prospective Investigation of the Vasculature in Uppsala Sweden  Seniors study that utilized blood tests to reveal exposure to phthalates, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethylene (DDT), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and perfluoroalkyl, among other chemicals.  Their findings indicate that a 25% reduction in exposure to certain household chemicals has the potential to reduce diabetes cases by approximately 13%.

Investigators then combed for significant connections between those chemicals and a variety of diseases.

A 2012 study published in Diabetes Care in 2012 compared phthalate levels in the 114 diabetic subjects and the 902 non-diabetic subjects. Following adjustment for sex, body mass index, serum cholesterol, triglycerides, education, smoking, and exercise, investigators noted that a significant relationship between phthalates in the blood and lowered insulin secretion, increased insulin resistance, or both. Egads!

Trasande suggested that household chemicals result in a cost of 340 billion dollars to the U.S. economy as a consequence of treatment costs and lost productivity. “Our findings speak to the need for a strong regulatory framework that proactively identifies chemical hazards before they are widely used, and the use of safer alternatives,” said the researchers.

“In the absence of such a framework, newly developed synthetic chemicals may emerge as diabetogenic exposures, replacing banned or substituted hazards as contributors.”

Dangerous toxins found in plastics, household chemicals, pesticides and even mattresses may contain damaging chemicals that are getting into our bodies and mimicking our hormones and interfering with the creation of our real hormones.

 

 


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MJ Stone is a Montreal writer and artist. He has worked as a journalist for the Globe and Mail and CBC and his copy has also been featured in Hour Magazine, MacLean's and Parabola Magazine. In 2012 Stone wrapped up his first novel, The fool. He has been writing and editing health-related material at Download Apps since 2014.